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大和堂, Kowloon City, Hong Kong

This may be one of the oldest Chinese medical clinics in Hong Kong. Previously I have been inundated with numerous pills at a local western medicine doctor at a reputable hospital. I didn’t get a very good explanation of my illness or my diagnosis, nor did his numerous pills cure me. So I decided to give 大和堂 a try. The Chinese medicine doctor first reads your pulse (both left and right wrists), then inspects your tongue, then you tell him what your problem is. He then prescribes his medicine on a pad of paper. His prescription is then passed to one of the ladies who work next to the doctor. You can choose to have them prepare the medicine for you there (additional cost), or you may take home and prepare yourself.

For certain ailments, it makes sense to see a traditional Chinese medical doctor. One time I had 3 canker-sores in my mouth, and that bitter medicine instantly soothed my aching sores.

The costly part is the herbal medicine, which runs around HKD $ 100+.
The fee to the doctor is only HKD $ 25.

This is where the doctor sits and reads your pulse.

A wall with the many drawers that contain the medicinal goodies.

If there is a line, grab a seat on this wooden bench, and wait for your turn.

Find a wooden stool that suits your height. Notice the light fixture is made out of newspaper.

This apparatus may bring back childhood memories for some.

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This entry was posted on February 13, 2012 by in Health, Hong Kong.
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